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Distinctions of properties

The last two postings feature the same thing, the capture of an action I called pinching. In both these cases the properties captured in the new system are elasticity,  and, I suggest, shape and a small amount of friction. The close proximity of the elastic teeth of the comb and the two sides of the […]

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inspiration?

Neat eh? But where did the inspiration come from? Many of the examples of extreme inventing feature the capture of some property of a natural object. The sharpness or heaviness of a stone, for example. I suggest this otherwise great idea (from the lolbrary) is inspired by an existing product, probably familiar to many kitchen […]

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Nail-hammer combo

DIYers will appreciate this one, even it its application is limited to flatter surfaces. However, it could be adapted, and then it would be an extreme innovation-maybe? I’m putting it forward as an example of emergent functionality, because the comb is being used for something it wasn’t originally designed for. Emergent properties present an opportunity […]

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In Extremis II

My first example of extreme inventing featured a ‘log wheel‘. This may not seem so extreme but its deviser does deserve the accolade ‘extreme inventor’. What functionality has been captured by using this found object (the trolley)? One its height, two its wheels, three its strength. Picture found at the lolbrary.com

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7UP? No— Light Up!

This is a perfect example of extreme inventing we were made aware of by Colin Dyas of Made in Liverpool Ltd. First we have a problem—darkness when lightness was needed—and then an extreme inventor recognised a property of a clear liquid to transmit light. Hey presto, the water bottle enabled solar light bulb was invented. […]

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